favorite
favorite
hide
unhide
flag

Posted

print

Antique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 - $80 (North Glendale)

Antique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 1 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 2 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 3 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 4 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 5 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 6 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 7 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 8 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 9 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 10 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 11 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 12 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 13 thumbnailAntique 1940's Blue Ridge Pottery hand-painted dishes Service for 4 14 thumbnail
53rd Avenue near Beardsley

google map

condition: like new
make / manufacturer: Blue Ridge Pottery
model name / number: Apple Trio

more ads by this user

Service for 4 Apple Trio Pattern
4 dinner plates
4 smaller plates
4 small bowls
4 saucers
4 cups
All in perfect "like new" condition!

The plates and dishes made from the 1930s to 1950s by Blue Ridge Southern Potteries in southern Appalachia. Manufactured during the dreary days of the Great Depression and World War II, they quickly became popular with homemakers as a way to bring a little cheerfulness into their homes. They are a very desirable collectible today and are in high demand.
Blue Ridge Southern Pottery began making their dishes in 1938 in Erwin, Tennessee, an economically depressed area of Appalachia. Most dishes during that time period were made with dull, lifeless decals for decoration. The use of a method of hand painting the dishes before the final glaze was fired, resulted in vibrant colors, which made the designs come alive. Women were recruited from "up in the hills" who had no artistic training to learn the basic folk painting strokes used in creating these works of art. Using broken pieces of china for practicing, they soon acquired the speed and skill needed to produce the pieces. The technique gave the dishes a happy and less formal appearance that was very endearing to customers.
Working in a group of 4 to 6 women, one person would paint stems, another would add the leaves, while others were adding petals and additional details. The patterns and jobs were changed frequently to prevent the work from becoming too monotonous for the painters.
Sales of the dishes flourished during the 1940's, especially during the years of WWII when imports were restricted. Much needed jobs were created by the plant as they employed as many as 500 painters who were earning an average pay rate of 13 1/2 cents an hour.
The dishes became a popular premium item offered by companies such as Quaker Oats and Avon. Major catalog retailers such as Sears & Roebuck and Montgomery Ward carried the Blue Ridge dishes in their mail-order selections. Grocery store chains offered them as a reward program gift to their faithful customers.
No two pieces were ever 100% alike.

post id: 7737296713

posted:

updated:

best of [?]

loading
reading
writing
saving
searching